May 2021

Live Talk | Living in Low Oxygen: Another Tool in Cancer’s Survival Kit | 18:30 (UK time), 18th May 2021.

Dr Isabel Pires – Cancer Biologist and Lecturer in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Hull. LIVE streaming at YouTube 18:30 (UK time), 18 May 2021.  Did you know that there are areas in a tumour that have virtually no oxygen at all? How can cancer cells survive in these conditions? How does this impact on treatment? In this talk we will discuss how cancer cells can hijack the process by which the tissues in our body respond to low oxygen conditions, not only to survive in these conditions, but also to become even more aggressive and resistant to therapy. We will also hear… Read More »Live Talk | Living in Low Oxygen: Another Tool in Cancer’s Survival Kit | 18:30 (UK time), 18th May 2021.

LIVE Q&A | Creating a Living Biobank for Ovarian Cancer to Develop New Therapies | 18:30 (UK time), 10 May 2021.

Professor Stephen Taylor – Manchester Cancer Research Centre LIVE streaming at YouTube 18:30 (UK time), 10 May 2021. Summary: For 15 years, I studied the intricacies of how human cells divide (mitosis) in order to make new cells, how this goes wrong when cells become cancerous and how to sensitise cancer cells to anti-mitotic chemotherapy drugs. All of this work took place using cancer cell lines – cancer cells that keep dividing over very long periods of time in a flask – which has been very informative, but unfortunately they often do not reflect the original tumour or have limited associated… Read More »LIVE Q&A | Creating a Living Biobank for Ovarian Cancer to Develop New Therapies | 18:30 (UK time), 10 May 2021.

Fighting Cancer with Protons

As a physicist, the things I learned at university were mostly along the lines of Maxwell’s equations, special relativity, Fourier transforms, quantum mechanics, and numerical methods. Five years ago I certainly didn’t envision myself working in cancer science, let alone be applying some of what I learned at university to cancer research.    Although I’ve barely stepped foot in a lab, I don’t have a white lab coat, and I haven’t looked down a microscope since GCSE biology, I’m now confident I can call myself a cancer researcher. Of course, it helps to be working in a multi-disciplinary group, with a team of supervisors made up of expert biologists, engineers, chemists and clinicians.     But as I’ve learned, physics also provides a crucial role in cancer science in many forms. For me,… Read More »Fighting Cancer with Protons